1

The Photographers of WW2

Two civilian pressmen were among the photographers called up to witness the British Expeditionary Force in 1939 and 1940. When the Second World War broke out in September 1939, just one Army photographer, Geoffrey Keating, and one cameraman, Harry Rignold, accompanied the British Expeditionary Force to France. On 24 October 1941, the Army agreed to…

6

The Last Post of Dunluce Castle

For Game of Thrones fans, Dunluce Castle is a highlight of any Northern Ireland location tour. Perching precariously on the basalt outcrops of the Antrim coast, its dramatic situation, plus a touch of CGI, turned Dunluce Castle into Castle Pike, Seat of the House Greyjoy, in fictional Westeros. For naval researchers, H.M.S. Dunluce Castle is a…

0

Misery on the Jellicoe Express

Throughout 2 world wars, the Jellicoe Express ran between London Euston and Thurso, linking the South of England ports with the Royal Navy’s Orkney anchorage in Scapa Flow. The train was named after Admiral John Jellicoe, Commander of the Grand Fleet at the Battle of Jutland in 1916. The first Jellicoe Trains ran from August 1914, carrying steam coal…

HMS Eaglet | Flagship Officer in Charge, Liverpool Docks © IWM (A 29000)
0

RNR Officers Club Liverpool

The RNR Officers’ Club Liverpool, more commonly known as the Sea Urchins, and based out of the stone frigate HMS Eaglet, was formed in 1921 and will thus celebrate its Centenary in 2021. To mark this special occasion it is intended to publish a book about the Club which will include a biography of all…

0

The End of Hostilities

The ‘Instrument of Surrender’ that concluded the end of hostilities of World War 2 was signed at Reims at 02:41 Central European Time (CET) on 7 May 1945. The signing took place in a red brick schoolhouse, the Collège Moderne et Technique de Reims which served as the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force. It was…

10

HMT Celia

Hostilities Only Signalman Brooks would see out the remaining months of the war on the minesweeping trawler HMT Celia (T134). Aside from brief spells attached to the trawler depot ship HMS Marshall Salt and five days back at Sparrow’s Nest, HMT Celia was home from June 28th 1944 until February 11th 1946. Celia was one of 12 ships of the Shakespeare…

0

HMS Ephretah

Also known as HMS Ephreta, the Admiralty Steam Drifter Ephretah was built at Oulton Broad, Lowestoft in 1918 named ‘Quicksand’. She was one of the many pre-war trawlers requisitioned by The Admiralty for minesweeper or anti-submarine work. The trawler, though not an ideal anti-submarine craft, was a cheap and accessible resource for that duty. The guns they could mount…

6

HMT Windermere

For the next 14 months (26 July 1942 until 11 October 1943) Signalman Brooks served under Skipper Jack Mawer RNR aboard HMT Windermere (FY 207.) [perfectpullquote align=”left” cite=”HMS Windermere underway on the Humber © IWM (FL 7286)” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””][/perfectpullquote] Windermere belonged to the Lake Class of the anti-submarine whalers. There were six in…

HMT Tranquil
0

HMT Tranquil

Whilst training at Western Isles Signalman Brooks briefly joined HMT Tranquil (FY 920) from 23rd April 1942 to 29th April 1942 under command of Temporary Lieutenant William Postlethwaite, RNR. Launched in 1912 as the Good Luck (1497), HMT Tranquil was a converted minesweeping trawler, one of many requisitioned by the admiralty in 1939. On 2nd November 1940, T/ Ltnt. William…

Images are for demo purposes only and are properties of their respective owners.
Old Paper by ThunderThemes.net